Catholic Bishop: Pro-Abortion Biden Shouldn’t Receive Communion | LifeNews.com

Catholic Bishop: Pro-Abortion Biden Shouldn’t Receive Communion | LifeNews.com.

Bishop Michael Sheridan speaks out in Colorado Springs.

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19 thoughts on “Catholic Bishop: Pro-Abortion Biden Shouldn’t Receive Communion | LifeNews.com

  1. Agreed, actually, he should be refused Holy Communion.
    Sometime in mid Summer it was that when Biden came to Phoenix to give a speech he was at our church. the Casa de Paz y Bien. Fortunately, I, as always, was at the 07:30 he was at the 09:15.

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      • Indeed. I think I would have to go to Confession right after Mass for the angry thoughts I would have if I were sitting in the same Mass as Biden. Or any of his ilk. If I lived in San Francisco, I’d have to change parishes so as not to attend Mass with Pelosi.

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        • Well, it is precisely for that reason that the Church always tried to guard Herself from scandal, which this assuredly is. Today, we seem to live in a perpetual state of scandal – we live in hard times.

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  2. I read the whole interview of Bishop Sheridan, and I’m glad I did. It brought up another subject with which I’ve struggled with since becoming Catholic, and that’s the issue of the death penalty. Several people have told me over the years that the Catholic Church is wholly opposed to the death penalty, and I had a very hard time with that. It’s a topic I’ve kept shelved for the most part, partly because I wasn’t ready to sit down with a priest and discuss it, and partly out of fear of being told that I had to accept that teaching and not being sure I could. I’d admittedly not looked it up in the Catechism, and I’m glad Bishop Sheridan spoke about what the Catechism actually says about the death penalty, that there may be circumstances which warrant it. That I can accept, because I would have a hard time accepting the idea that someone like the DC sniper, or any other mass murderer, should not be punished with the death penalty and that doing so would be going against God’s will.

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    • The actual teaching of the Catechism is this:
      2267 Assuming that the guilty party’s identity and responsibility have been fully determined, the traditional teaching of the Church does not exclude recourse to the death penalty, if this is the only possible way of effectively defending human lives against the unjust aggressor.
      If, however, non-lethal means are sufficient to defend and protect people’s safety from the aggressor, authority will limit itself to such means, as these are more in keeping with the concrete conditions of the common good and are more in conformity to the dignity of the human person.
      Today, in fact, as a consequence of the possibilities which the state has for effectively preventing crime, by rendering one who has committed an offense incapable of doing harm – without definitely taking away from him the possibility of redeeming himself – the cases in which the execution of the offender is an absolute necessity “are very rare, if not practically non-existent.”

      So it does not depend so much what a person does but on the ability of the society to keep these people from doing harm: which is an obligation. The Bishop is right in saying that it is not of the same order as an intrinsic evil such as abortion or euthanasia. The unborn and the sick and dying do not pose a threat to society, obviously.

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      • One of my biggest struggles I have is that I think by not having the possibility of the death penalty for heinous crimes, it’s a statement that we don’t have a respect for life, in that by not having the ultimate penalty for the crime of taking another life, we in effect are saying that it’s not that bad on the part of the criminal for committing murder. Conversely, by having death as a possible punishment for murder, I think we are showing just how highly we regard and respect life.

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        • You’re not alone in your thinking my friend. I somehow think the teaching in the Catechism may be a bit too compassionate for the criminal in the way that it is written and not compassionate enough for potential victims and their families: because, as you say, without the death penalty as a deterent I think we are inviting more violent behavior.

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      • One thing I would like to say is that when I ask you the occasional question about the Catholic faith, I am asking you as a younger member of the Church. Don’t hesitate to set me straight if it looks like my thinking is not in line with Catholic teaching. It won’t hurt me at all; I want to grow in the faith and hold to the teachings of the Church, and if I am out of line, I would hope others take the time to help get me back on track.

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