Why We Say Yes to the Dinner Invitation

Divine action, being limitless in its plenitude, can take possession of a soul only to the extent to which that soul is emptied of all trust in its own action.

For such self-confidence is a spurious fullness that excludes divine action.

This is the obstacle most likely to impede divine action, namely, that which is found in the soul itself, for in the case of external obstacles the divine action can, when it chooses, convert them into useful means. Everything is equally useful and useless to it. Without it everything is as nothing, and with it nothing becomes everything. Meditation, contemplation, vocal prayers, interior silence, acts of the faculties of the soul, whether accompanied by emotional feelings, and whether distinctly or less clearly perceived, a life of retirement or an active one, all these things may be valuable in themselves, but the best of all for the soul is what God wills at this particular moment, and ail else must be regarded by the soul with perfect indifference as being nothing at all.

Read more . . .

Virtue and Music: Raising the Bar – Truth and Charity Forum

By Fr. Basil Cole, O.P.

I once wrote a book called Music and Morals in which I tried to show that some music has a dispositive effect on the moral life. Music does not immediately or directly cause virtue or otherwise the beautiful works of Mozart or Bach that were played at the same time while the Nazis were killing Jews would have prevented such atrocities.

Like preaching itself, many works of music motivate to transcendence or degradation of one’s moral life. For example, listening to Gregorian chant or Palestrina at the Mass, all things considered, normally intensifies prayer because the mood is prayerful caused in large part by prayerful singers. If one understands Latin, then the sentences take on a richer meaning leading to contemplative prayer, more or less, depending on one’s spiritual life. It can introduce the listener to the praise and adoration of God himself.

Read more . . . Virtue and Music: Raising the Bar – Truth and Charity Forum.

O Sacred Head Surrounded: Hymn

SONGS FOR THE SPIRIT: SUNDAY SYMPHONY

O sacred head, surrounded
by crown of piercing thorn!
O bleeding head, so wounded,
reviled and put to scorn!
Death’s pallid hue comes over you
The glow of life decays,
yet angel hosts adore thee
and tremble as they gaze

I see thy strength and vigor all fading in the strife,
and death with cruel rigor,
bereaving thee of life;
O agony and dying!
O love to sinners free!
Jesus, all grace supplying,
O turn thy face on me.

In this thy bitter passion,
Good Shepherd, think of me
with thy most sweet compassion,
unworthy though I be:
beneath thy cross abiding
for ever would I rest,
in thy dear love confiding,
and with thy presence blest.

Salve Regina

I am testing out an idea (which I got from my good friend at The Accidental Kansan) to see if you might be interested. I am thinking of introducing Traditional Catholic Music and Hymns, probably on Sunday’s since many have not heard our depth of beautiful music that has been neglected far too long. I am interested to see what you think of this idea.